Working during your studies

Working part-time is sometimes not just the cherry-on-top for your CV,but can become a necessity to get by. According to the 20th survey by the German Student Service (“Deutsche Studentenwerk”), the average student in Germany is 24 years old and has 864 euros per month at his/her disposal. 25% has less than 675 Euros monthly to get by, while the top 25% has over 1000 Euros. For others that are not eligible for BAföG1 (i.e. foreign students) or receive a negligible amount, the reality is tha...
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Exam Prep

Studying. Stu-DYING. The word "dying" is part of the word and yet most of your time at Uni will (should!) be spent on this, so having a good study plan is essential. The workload at Uni is miles beyond high school, be it depth or breadthwise and yet freshmen underestimate it despite repeated warnings of the fact. Romy’s post has some excellent strategies on how to get better grades and I decided to chime in with other ideas that may prove to be of some use. If you are a Civil Engineering stu...
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First Steps

Studying in a foreign country is an enriching experience, you get to learn a new language, a new culture and you get to view things with a different lens. Germany is a beloved destination for students worldwide, due to low (if any) tuition fees, world-class education/reputation as well as a strong economy that enables highly qualified graduates to stay on after their courses. This is a short guide that has the issues that you will have to keep in mind as an international student. I have purp...
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Finding a place

Finding a place can be a daunting task for (foreign) students. My fellow blogger Raihan managed to get the best option, a “Studentenwohnheim” (“Uni housing”), but this option is not accessible to everybody. This short post will give you an overview of the three prevalent options in Germany as well as give you a few things to consider before you settle down. The lingo you will need: - “Kaltmiete” (“cold rent”): this is the rent price without any extras (electricity, water, internet and misc...
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Civil Engineer’s Guide

When I started my Bachelor’s, I remember not knowing which subjects to devote most of my time to. This is my subjective guide to the civil engineering course at Uni Stuttgart that will hopefully prove to be of some use to prospective civil engineers. Caveat: One mistake that I made was to take the word of those in higher semesters as iron-clad truths. As mentioned above, this is a subjective guide to the course. I also took into account the opinions of fellow students and the subjects wit...
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